Sheep

Rough, Cheviots, Swaledale, Agriculture, Dalesbred Cross, Dipping, heathing, Herdwick, Lambs, Lonks, Pastures, Penning, Shedding, Salving, Scrapey, Sheep Gates, Sheep gathering, Sheep Rights, Sheep Sales, Shearing, Clipping, Traders, Tups, Rams, Ewes, Wool, Winter, Animal,

Sam Dyson, Full Transcript

In his interview with W.R. Mitchell, Mr. Dyson recalls buying his first smallholding, Buckley Farm, Stanbury, in 1939. With the help of his wife Mrs. Peggy Dyson (PD) and a friend and neighbour Adrian Bancroft (AB), he recounts living and working on that smallholding and the other farms he has bought and worked in the Stanbury area, including Ponden Hall Farm. With a background in farming for over 50 years they relate many interesting stories, and often with humour. The interview is noteworthy for its poetic regional dialect, comical turn of phrase, its gusto and articulacy.

Norman Swindlehurst, Full Transcript Part 2

Norman Swindlehurst (NS) was interviewed many times by W.R. Mitchell (WRM). In this section of the interview Norman describes farming sheep in Keasden in the early part of the 20th century. He mentions the winter of 1917 when sheep were buried in snow for weeks. Norman's sister Marion reared twelve lambs by bottle. Some of the starving lambs were placed in the steaming horse midden to warmed up, and others were given a drop of brandy.

Norman Swindlehurst, Full Transcript Part 1

Norman Swindlehurst (NS) of Keasden was interviewed by W.R. Mitchell (WRM) many times. In this interview he mentions many local personalities and their employments, including detailed descriptions of farming, weddings, cooking, sheep salving and social events.

Norman Swindlehurst

Norman Swindlehurst lived and farmed at Brackengarth Farm in Keasden, in the Ribble Valley. His father James Swindlehurst, who suffered from rheumatic fever, had moved from Barrow-in-Furness to the healthier countryside of Keasden in 1896. The family kept a few calves and reared sheep on the moors on the 40-acre farm at Brackengarth from 1896 until they moved to bigger farms in 1932.

Kit Calvert, Full Transcript Part 2

Kit Calvert talks about the Depression and the difficulties farmers faced. He explains how the creation of the Milk Marketing Board in 1933 coincided with the Hawes creditor farmers taking over the town creamery. The nature of dales folk is discussed, their ‘strength in adversity’, and whether this is attributable to a Norse heritage, the influence of Chapel, or simply the weather, the isolation and the poverty of rural Dales hamlets

Kit Calvert, Full Transcript Part 1

Kit Calvert (KC) was interviewed by W.R. Mitchell (WRM) many times. In this particular interview Kit Calvert describes memories of his childhood in Hawes. He tells tales of unemployment and hardship in the Dales, particularly during the Depression.

Jim Smith, Audio Clip

Jim Smith (JS) talks to W.R. Mitchell (WRM) about the winter of 1947 when many sheep were lost due to the extreme weather conditions.

Jim Smith

Jim Smith was the son of Joseph Waller Smith and grandson of J.W. Smith. He moved to Whinney Mire Farm, near Newby and Ingleton in Ribblesdale, on the slopes of Ingleborough hill, when he was just a small baby.

In his interview with W.R. Mitchell, Jim Smith describes the difficulties of farming Dalesbred and Swaledale sheep on the slopes of Ingleborough, and different ways of gathering the sheep for shearing and clipping, from heathing to shedding and penning. He also describes the impact of over-stocking on the heather on the moors and the decline of grouse shooting. 

John Geldard, Full Transcript

 John Geldard talks about his life in Malham and particularly dry stone walling.

Annie Mason, Full Transcript Part 1

Anne Margaret Mason (AM) describes life on an Upper Wensleydale farm in the first half of the 20th century, describing in particular haymaking, outdoor milking, sheep management, lambing time, servants, washday, cheese-making and baking.

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