Clapham

Thomas Dugdale, Full Transcript Part 1

Thomas Dugdale (TD) was interviewed by W.R. Mitchell (WRM) many times. In this particular interview Thomas Dugdale talks about life in Settle and Giggleswick between the First World War and the Second World War. He talks about his grandfather, Javez Dugdale, who was an auctioneer and Methodist minister and his father, William Edward Dugdale, an engineer, who continued the auctioneering business.

Eleanor Yorke, Full Transcript Part 2

W.R. Mitchell (WRM) and Eleanor Yorke (EY) continue to discuss the history of the Yorke family. Eleanor Yorke lists the characteristics of Yorke men. The sporting tradition in the family, sports such as grouse-shooting, fishing and hare hunting, are outlined. Major John Edward Evelyn Yorke (JY) comes into the interview at about 9 minutes, focusing on grouse shooting and continuing to discuss the estate.

Norman Swindlehurst, Full Transcript Part 2

Norman Swindlehurst (NS) was interviewed many times by W.R. Mitchell (WRM). In this section of the interview Norman describes farming sheep in Keasden in the early part of the 20th century. He mentions the winter of 1917 when sheep were buried in snow for weeks. Norman's sister Marion reared twelve lambs by bottle. Some of the starving lambs were placed in the steaming horse midden to warmed up, and others were given a drop of brandy.

Norman Swindlehurst, Full Transcript Part 1

Norman Swindlehurst (NS) of Keasden was interviewed by W.R. Mitchell (WRM) many times. In this interview he mentions many local personalities and their employments, including detailed descriptions of farming, weddings, cooking, sheep salving and social events.

Jim Smith, Audio Clip

Jim Smith (JS) talks to W.R. Mitchell (WRM) about the winter of 1947 when many sheep were lost due to the extreme weather conditions.

John Geldard, Full Transcript

 John Geldard talks about his life in Malham and particularly dry stone walling.

John Geldard

John Geldard farmed for many years at the head of Malhamdale. He was born at Green Close Farm in 1919 in an area between Clapham and Bentham, near Ingleborough. When John was six weeks old the Geldard family—Thomas Henry, his wife Ellen and three children—moved to Malhamdale. Baby John was carried in a clothes basket softened by a blanket and grew up at Prior Hall Farm in Malham, near Malham Cove.

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