Dialect

Thomas Dugdale, Full Transcript Part 2

Thomas Dugdale (TD) was interviewed by W.R. Mitchell (WRM) many times. In this particular interview Thomas Dugdale talks about life in Settle and Giggleswick between the First World War and the Second World War. He talks about his grandfather, Javez Dugdale, who was an auctioneer and Methodist minister, and his father, William Edward Dugdale, an engineer, who continued the auctioneering business.

Thomas Dugdale, Audio Clip

Thomas Dugdale (TD) was interviewed many times by W.R. Mitchell (WRM). In this segment Tommy discusses the early cinema in Settle.

Thomas Dugdale

Thomas Dugdale was born in 1912 in Settle. His grandfather Javez Dugdale of Priest Hutton near Kendal was the first Dugdale to move into the Settle area having worked as an auctioneer and Methodist preacher in Burton-in-Holme and Lancaster. Jabez sold John o' Gaunt sheep dip to farmers in the Craven area and also did farm evaluations, gradually building up his own business. Thomas Dugdale’s father William Eddie married Gertrude Harger and they continued the family business.

Eleanor Yorke, Audio Clip

W.R. Mitchell (WRM) and Eleanor Yorke (EY) discuss the history of the Yorke family, from Sir Richard Yorke who was a wealthy York Merchant and Lord Mayor of the city of York in the late 1400s. Eleanor Yorke discusses the properties that the family held in Nidderdale from the sixteenth century and the story of Sir John Yorke of Gowthwaite, a catholic, who was fined by the Star Chamber in 1611 for allowing a pro-Catholic play to be performed in his home in 1609 over the Christmas period.

The Yorkes of Halton Place

The Yorke family of Halton Place traced their ancestry back to Sir Richard Yorke, a wool merchant of the city of York who was knighted by Henry VII shortly after the Battle of Bosworth. Sir Richard Yorke's family went on to gain many lands in Nidderdale and later in the Craven area. One of Sir Richard Yorke's descendants was famously tried in the Star Chamber in 1611 for holding a ‘Catholic’ play in his home at Gowthwaite Hall in Nidderdale. Just six years after the Gunpowder Plot, he was also accused retrospectively of being involved in that—but he managed to establish his innocence.

Sam Dyson, Full Transcript

In his interview with W.R. Mitchell, Mr. Dyson recalls buying his first smallholding, Buckley Farm, Stanbury, in 1939. With the help of his wife Mrs. Peggy Dyson (PD) and a friend and neighbour Adrian Bancroft (AB), he recounts living and working on that smallholding and the other farms he has bought and worked in the Stanbury area, including Ponden Hall Farm. With a background in farming for over 50 years they relate many interesting stories, and often with humour. The interview is noteworthy for its poetic regional dialect, comical turn of phrase, its gusto and articulacy.

Sam Dyson, Audio Clip

Sam Dyson (SD) was interviewed many times by W.R. Mitchell (WRM). In this segment Sam tells Bill, with the help of his wife Peggy (PD) in the background, the story of how he bought his first farm, Buckley Farm, Stanbury, near Haworth.

Sam Dyson

Sam Dyson was born in 1913 and married his wife, Peggy Barker, in 1939. He farmed at Buckley Farm, Stanbury, near Top Withens, a farm made famous by Emily Bronte's classic novel ’Wuthering Heights’. Sam and his wife farmed shorthorn cattle. had an egg round and gradually built up their business and land from 4 acres to over 50 acres. They also catered for visitors who walked the Bronte way. You can see an image of a shorthorn to the right. 

Philip Dawson, Audio Clip

In this clip Philip Dawson (PD) tells W.R. Mitchell (WRM) the story of William Craven of Appletreewick, who became Lord Mayor of London in the 17th century.

Norman Swindlehurst, Full Transcript Part 2

Norman Swindlehurst (NS) was interviewed many times by W.R. Mitchell (WRM). In this section of the interview Norman describes farming sheep in Keasden in the early part of the 20th century. He mentions the winter of 1917 when sheep were buried in snow for weeks. Norman's sister Marion reared twelve lambs by bottle. Some of the starving lambs were placed in the steaming horse midden to warmed up, and others were given a drop of brandy.

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